Four Weeks

The sunrise is red through the blinds and somehow the baby is four weeks old.

There’s no margin between days. Instead the sound of feet running down the hallway, the door creaking open and two small voices saying good morning in the dark. Someone reaches a hand into the quiet nest of the bed and the baby stirs next to the mother, stretches and curls tiny arms and legs, and someone trips on a twist of clothes on the floor and hits their head on the bed’s edge and now they’re howling. It’s seven in the morning, as loud with need and newness as seven the night before.

The sunrise is red but the day will be dark, low with clouds and the threat of snow. They will all be in the house again together, and now the father is grinding coffee, and the five-year-old is spinning and jumping across the floor, a slept-in tangle of hair at the back of her head. She approximates ballet moves from a video lesson emailed each week– a teacher she’ll never meet, classmates scattered across states–What does échappé mean, mama? Watch me, watch this!

There’s no margin between days and the mother rubs sleep from her eyes, tries to access the part of her brain that once knew French. She holds her third baby to her breast with one hand while the father puts a cup of coffee in the other hand. This is love’s language– a cup of coffee, a look exchanged.

The sunrise is red and the father is tired, but he picks up the middle child so he can see, too, this boy too suddenly big beside the new baby, whose feet move too fast for the rest of him, who says I fell down every night when they recount the day’s roses and thorns. Why it have those poky things, mama? he asks in the yard, little eyebrows furrowed at the one pink bud on the bush. Why does every sweet thing come with some pain, why does sun make shadows, how does the year behind us still trail its weight into this one?

There’s no margin between days or years and the baby was born at the threshold of both. The mother knows her own tendency to will time forward, tries to root herself down into this day, its shapes and sounds.

Somehow the baby is four weeks old and there will never be another first month with a baby again, each first becoming one last time. Soon enough she’ll sleep, and she’ll sleep, and he’ll sleep. They’ll have conversations longer than a minute. He won’t always fall. She won’t always dance in the living room.

The sunrise was red and later the first flurries of winter came down. The kids put on boots and gloves and woke the baby, whooping and shouting in the yard, and it wasn’t enough to be snow, not really. It felt like rain but lighter somehow, and it left little prints in their hands.


I wrote this with Rhythm, a year of weekly writing prompts. See more at #rhythmwriting2021

3 thoughts on “Four Weeks

  1. Dear Melissa, your writing is gorgeous and so is your new baby. What an incredible feat to make time to write right now and to share it with others. I’m blessed by your generosity and the beauty of this gift. May you be blessed with rest in the thrum of all this life.Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

    1. Thank you Cathy. I really appreciate you taking the time to read! I’m grateful for any scrap of time I get to step outside and find enough distance from the day-to-day to see it from a different angle. I know you feel the same way and I’m grateful for your writing, too.

  2. Oh dang, Melissa, this brought me to tears! So beautiful. I loved this: “each first becoming one last time.”

    Thank you for sharing these moments with such an open heart. 💖💖💖

    On Tue, Jan 26, 2021 at 8:58 PM Melissa Reeser Poulin wrote:

    > Melissa R Poulin posted: ” The sunrise is red through the blinds and > somehow the baby is four weeks old. There’s no margin between days. Instead > the sound of feet running down the hallway, the door creaking open and two > small voices saying good morning in the dark. Someone” >

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